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Sunday, October 6

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    11:12 am

Friday, February 4

  1. msg new message posted new To Madame Diane de Foix, Comtesse de Gurson. A friend of mine, then, having read the preceding c…
    new
    To Madame Diane de Foix, Comtesse de Gurson.

    A friend of mine, then, having read the preceding chapter, the other day told me, that I should a little farther have extended my discourse on the education of children. Now, madame, if I had any sufficiency in this subject, I could not possibly better employ it, than to present my best instructions to the little gentleman that threatens you shortly with a happy birth (for you are too generous to begin otherwise than with a male); for having had so great a hand in the treaty of your marriage, I have a certain particular right and interest in the greatness and prosperity of the issue that shall spring from it; besides that, your having had the best of my services so long in possession, sufficiently obliges me to desire the honor and advantage of all wherein you shall be concerned. But, in truth, all I understand as to that particular is only this, that the greatest and most important difficulty of human science is the education of children. For as in agriculture, the husbandry that is to precede planting, as also planting itself, is certain, plain, and well known; but after that which is planted comes to life, there is a great deal more to be done, more art to be used, more care to be taken, and much more difficulty to cultivate and bring it to perfection; so it is with men; it is no hard matter to get children; but after they are born, then begins the trouble, solicitude, and care rightly to train, principle, and bring them up. The symptoms of their inclinations in that tender age are so obscure, and the promises so uncertain and fallacious, that it is very hard to establish any solid judgment or conjecture upon them. Look at Cimon, for example, and Themistocles, and a thousand others, who very much deceived the expectation men had of them. Cubs of bears and puppies readily discover their natural inclination; but men, so soon as ever they are grown up, applying themselves to certain habits, engaging themselves in certain opinions, and conforming themselves to particular laws and customs, easily alter, or at least disguise, their true and real disposition; and yet it is hard to force the propension of nature. Whence it comes to pass, that for not having chosen the right course, we often take very great pains, and consume a good part of our time in training up children to things, for which, by their natural constitution, they are totally unfit. In this difficulty, nevertheless, I am clearly of opinion, that they ought to be elemented in the best and most advantageous studies, without taking too much notice of, or being too superstitious in those light prognostics they give of themselves in their tender years, and to which Plato, in his Republic, gives, methinks, too much authority.
    Madame, science, is a very great ornament, and a thing of marvelous use, especially in persons raised to that degree of fortune in which you are. And, in truth, in persons of mean and low condition, it cannot perform its true and genuine office, being naturally more prompt to assist in the conduct of war, in the government of peoples, in negotiating the leagues and friendships of princes and foreign nations, than in forming a syllogism in logic, in pleading a process in law, or in prescribing a dose of pills in physic. Wherefore, madame, believing you will not omit this so necessary feature in the education of your children, who yourself have tasted its sweetness, and are of a learned extraction (for we yet have the writings of the ancient Counts of Foix, from whom my lord, your husband, and yourself, are both of you descended, and Monsieur de Candale, your uncle, every day obliges the world with others, which will extend the knowledge of this quality in your family for so many succeeding ages), I will, upon this occasion, presume to acquaint your ladyship, with one particular fancy of my own, contrary to the common method, which is all I am able to contribute to your service in this affair.
    The charge of the tutor you shall provide for your son, upon the choice of whom depends the whole success of his education, has several other great and considerable parts and duties required in so important a trust, besides that of which I am about to speak: these, however, I shall not mention, as being unable to add anything of moment to the common rules: and in this, wherein I take upon me to advise, he may follow it so far only as it shall appear advisable.
    For a boy of quality then, who pretends to letters not upon the account of profit (for so mean an object as that is unworthy of the grace and favor of the Muses, and moreover, in it a man directs his service to and depends upon others), nor so much for outward ornament, as for his own proper and peculiar use, and to furnish and enrich himself within, having rather a desire to come out an accomplished cavalier than a mere scholar or learned man; for such a one, I say, I would, also, have his friends solicitous to find him out a tutor, who has rather a well-made than a well-filled head; seeking, indeed, both the one and the other, but rather of the two to prefer manners and judgment to mere learning, and that this man should exercise his charge after a new method.
    'Tis the custom of pedagogues to be eternally thundering in their pupil's ears, as they were pouring into a funnel, while the business of the pupil is only to repeat what the others have said: now I would have a tutor to correct this error, and, that at the very first, he should, according to the capacity he has to deal with, put it to the test, permitting his pupil himself to taste things, and of himself to discern and choose them, sometimes opening the way to him, and sometimes leaving him to open it for himself; that is, I would not have him alone to invent and speak, but that he should also hear his pupil speak in turn. Socrates, and since him Arcesilaus, made first their scholars speak, and then they spoke to them. "Obest plerumque iis, qui discere volunt, auctoritas eorum, qui docent." It is good to make him, like a young horse, trot before him that he may judge of his going and how much he is to abate of his own speed, to accommodate himself to the vigor and capacity of the other. For want of which due proportion we spoil all; which also to know how to adjust, and to keep within an exact and due measure, is one of the hardest things I know, and 'tis the effect of a high and well-tempered soul to know how to condescend to such puerile motions and to govern and direct them. I walk firmer and more secure up hill than down.
    Such as, according to our common way of teaching, undertake, with one and the same lesson, and the same measure of direction, to instruct several boys of differing and unequal capacities, are infinitely mistaken; and 'tis no wonder, if in a whole multitude of scholars, there are not found above two or three who bring away any good account of their time and discipline. Let the master not only examine him about the grammatical construction of the bare words of his lesson, but about the sense and substance of them, and let him judge of the profit he has made, not by the testimony of his memory, but by that of his life. Let him make him put what he has learned into a hundred several forms, and accommodate it to so many several subjects, to see if he yet rightly comprehends it, and has made it his own, taking instruction of his progress by the pedagogic institutions of Plato. 'Tis a sign of crudity and indigestion to disgorge what we eat in the same condition it was swallowed; the stomach has not performed its office unless it have altered the form and condition of what was committed to it to concoct. Our minds work only upon trust, when bound and compelled to follow the appetite of another's fancy, enslaved and captivated under the authority of another's instruction; we have been so subjected to the trammel, that we have no free, nor natural pace of our own; our own vigor and liberty are extinct and gone: "Nunquam tutelae suae fiunt."
    I was privately carried at Pisa to see a very honest man, but so great an Aristotelian, that his most usual thesis was: "That the touchstone and square of all solid imagination, and of all truth, was an absolute conformity to Aristotle's doctrine; and that all besides was nothing but inanity and chimera; for that he had seen all, and said all." A position, that for having been a little too injuriously and broadly interpreted, brought him once and long kept him in great danger of the Inquisition at Rome.
    Let him make him examine and thoroughly sift everything he reads, and lodge nothing in his fancy upon simple authority and upon trust. Aristotle's principles will then be no more principles to
    12:36 am

Friday, January 15

  1. page S1 Course 08-09 edited ... Freetypinggame.net is good for light relief at the end of the lessons, although there are less…
    ...
    Freetypinggame.net is good for light relief at the end of the lessons, although there are lessons on this site as well as games.
    TypingTest.com is good at the end of this unit of work
    [[http://typeonline.co.uk |typeonline.co.uk ]]http://typeonline.co.uk
    Lesson 5 - Keyboard Skills
    Hand out usernames and passwords
    (view changes)
    12:38 am
  2. page S1 Course 08-09 edited ... Freetypinggame.net is good for light relief at the end of the lessons, although there are less…
    ...
    Freetypinggame.net is good for light relief at the end of the lessons, although there are lessons on this site as well as games.
    TypingTest.com is good at the end of this unit of work
    [[http://typeonline.co.uk |typeonline.co.uk ]]
    Lesson 5 - Keyboard Skills
    Hand out usernames and passwords
    (view changes)
    12:37 am

Monday, December 7

  1. page NC Digital Media Computing edited ... Plans for teaching NC DMC at Castlebrae are below: S3-4 Blogging Framing and shots Comic …
    ...
    Plans for teaching NC DMC at Castlebrae are below:
    S3-4
    Blogging
    Framing and shots
    Comic Life - photostory
    Discuss different shots
    Take photos using different types of shots
    Import photos into Comic Life
    Add speech bubbles
    Animation
    Filming
    Show how to use cameras and tripods
    Task 1
    In groups make a short film of a door opening
    Narrative - what's behind the door? who's opened the door? why's the door opening?
    Filming - use at least four different types of shots, eg close-up on door handle
    Task 2
    Each member of the group take a turn taking to camera, each person take a turn filming.
    Say:
    Your name
    An interesting fact about you
    Something that is special or important to you
    What you want to be when you grow up
    Your favourite music

    S5
    Core: Numeracy
    (view changes)
    5:58 am

Thursday, August 27

  1. page S2 Course 08-09 edited ... Discuss what to do if you are asked to meet an internet friend (tell an adult, bring an adult)…
    ...
    Discuss what to do if you are asked to meet an internet friend (tell an adult, bring an adult)
    Lesson 2
    ...
    (boys version) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-n8J3WDq5Q&feature=PlayList&p=23B9BB5796408C76
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-n8J3WDq5Q&feature=PlayList&p=23B9BB5796408C76
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4vyRBMjEv8&feature=PlayList&p=23B9BB5796408C76

    Discuss how to tell the new S1 pupils how to safe online
    Write slogans and messages on whiteboard
    (view changes)
    1:45 am
  2. page S2 Course 08-09 edited ... Discuss what to do if you are asked to meet an internet friend (tell an adult, bring an adult)…
    ...
    Discuss what to do if you are asked to meet an internet friend (tell an adult, bring an adult)
    Lesson 2
    ...
    (boys version) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-n8J3WDq5Q&feature=PlayList&p=23B9BB5796408C76
    Discuss how to tell the new S1 pupils how to safe online
    Write slogans and messages on whiteboard
    (view changes)
    1:39 am

Monday, August 24

  1. page VB Programming edited S4 Programming using Visual Basic Lesson 0 - Lightbot programming Use Lightbot to explain prog…

    S4 Programming using Visual Basic
    Lesson 0 - Lightbot programming
    Use Lightbot to explain programming principles like instructions, testing and functions
    http://www.gameroo.com/games/light-bot

    Lesson 1 - Thursday 21/8
    Introduction to object orientated programming
    (view changes)
    2:57 am

Friday, June 5

  1. page NC Digital Media Computing edited NC Digital Media Computing General unit-by-unit information is available here Plans for teac…

    NC Digital Media Computing
    General unit-by-unit information is available here
    Plans for teaching NC DMC at Castlebrae are below:

    S3-4
    S5
    Core Units
    Intermediate 1 (Level 4)
    Intermediate 2 (Level 5)
    Higher (Level 6)
    Intro to Internet and Online Comms (4)
    Intro to Internet and Online Comms (5)
    Intro to Internet and Online Comms (5)
    Office and Personal Productivity Apps (4)
    Office and Personal Productivity Apps (5)
    Office and Personal Productivity Apps (5)
    Computer
    Core: Numeracy
    Core: Communications
    Core:
    Hardware and Systems (4)
    Computer Hardware and Systems (5)
    Computer Hardware and Systems (5)
    Digital Media Elements for Apps (4)
    Digital Media Elements for Apps (5)
    Digital Media Elements for Apps (5)
    Digital Numeracy (3)
    Numeracy (5)
    Numeracy (5)
    Digital Communication Methods (3)
    Communications (4)
    Communications (4)
    Optional Units
    Blah

    (view changes)
    12:48 am

Thursday, June 4

  1. page NC Digital Media Computing edited ... S3-4 S5 Core Units Intermediate 1 (Level 4) Intermediate 2 (Level 5) ... Communication…
    ...
    S3-4
    S5
    Core Units
    Intermediate 1 (Level 4)
    Intermediate 2 (Level 5)
    ...
    Communications (4)
    Communications (4)
    Optional Units
    Blah

    (view changes)
    1:56 am

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